Collaborators

 'Unbound' is an interdisciplinary, creative project across borders that encourages collaboration with poets, writers, artists, musicians, composers, as well as computer science and arts, and arts and humanities experts around the world around the idea of multilinguality in poetry writing in different contexts and across different media. 

List of current / past collaborators:

Language Acts and Worldmaking is a flagship project funded by the AHRC Open World Research Initiative, which aims to regenerate and transform modern language learning by foregrounding language’s power to shape how we live and make our worlds. “Unbound” is part of the 2018 and 2019 Small Grants programme.

Alo Allik, sound artist, researcher, programmer from London. Alo is an Estonian sound artist who has performed his live coded electronic music and generative computer graphics throughout the world. His aesthetically and geographically restless lifestyle has enabled him to traverse a diverse range of musical worlds including DJ-ing electronic dance music, live electronic jam sessions, electroacoustic composition, free improvisation and audiovisual performances. Currently, Alo works as a researcher, programmer and lecturer in London, while continuing to perform his music and visuals to audiences worldwide. 

Iñigo Berrón
is an assistant editor, videographer and translator from Mexico living in London since 2014.

Kate Bligh is Artistic Director of the bilingual theatre company temenos, which she founded in January 2003. Post/de-colonialism and multiculturalism are recurring themes in her artistic practice, writing, and teaching, and her work often focuses on Irish and African diasporic drama, and on multi- and inter- lingual performance. An immigrant to Quebec (in 1996) from the UK, Kate has an M.A. degree in theatre directing from the Drama Centre in London and the University of Birmingham. She has been working, studying and creating in professional theatre for over thirty years.

Catherine Boyle,
Director Language Acts and Worldmaking, King’s College London. Catherine is Professor of Latin American Cultural Studies at King’s College London. She has published widely on Latin American culture, theatre and performance and women’s writing and gender. She is a translator of Latin American theatre and poetry. Catherine Boyle is the Principal Investigator for Language Acts and Worldmaking and the project’s strand lead for Translation Acts.

Gary Bromham
is a producer, mix engineer and guitarist who has worked with some truly legendary artists – Bjork, Sheryl Crow and George Michael to name but a few. Gary is currently a PhD researcher at the Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of London. 

David Caddy
 is a poet, essayist, critic and literary sociologist. His most recent book is Cycling After Thomas And The English (Spout Hill Press 2013). He was co-author of London: City of Words (2006), a literary companion, with Westrow Cooper. Most recent books of poems are So Here We Are (Shearsman 2012) and The Bunny Poems (Shearsman 2011). David is the editor of the Tears in the Fence independent literary magazine. The international magazine has championed a range of international poetics and poetries in both its creative and critical sections throughout its thirty five year history.

Alan Chamberlain
is a contemporary composer and researcher. He is currently a Senior Research Fellow in the Mixed Reality Lab, Computer Science, the University of Nottingham. He has published numerous papers on many aspects of Human Computer Interaction, ranging from the Arts to Artificial Intelligence and Design. He is an Honorary Fellow in the Department of Music, University of Nottingham and is a Composer in Residence at the Computational Foundry, Swansea University. 

Isabelle Dumont
is an actress and playwright based in Brussels. After studying literature, she turned to performing arts. Isabelle has been working as a performer since 1986 (among other, for theatre directors Alain Populaire, Charlie Degotte, Philippe van Kessel, the choreographer Félicette Chazerand, as well as the musical theatre company of Ingrid von Wantoch Rekowski). As a playwright, Isabelle collaborates with other artists (theatre director Dominique Roodthooft, filmmakers Jorge León and Boris Vanderavoort) and creates her own performances; in particular lectures-shows accompanied by the “cabinets de curiosités” (on the Baroque, natural sciences, etc.) and conference-concerts.

Pierre Elliot
is an actor and a native French speaker based in London. He has recently graduated from the Guildhall School of Music and Drama and has worked with BBC4 radio since then. 

Bridget Knapper is a founding director of the UK membership association for the international movement Economy for the Common Good which seeks a society where the goal is a good life for all. She has an MA in French and Francophone Studies and has previously worked as teacher and Modern Foreign Languages leader in primary schools. She is a freelance communications consultant. Bridget speaks French and German and enjoys collaborating on a range of creative projects.

Emma Macpherson is a student of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary University of London. She is the assistant editor of the poetry magazine Peach. Emma is bilingual; she speaks French and English. She was born in Paris and currently lives in London.

Delphine Salkin is a theatre director, actress, author and creator for Radio France Culture (in particular) based in Paris. Last year, she wrote, directed and performed Interior Voices in Brussels (Théâtre du Rideau – December 2019) and she directed Abi Morgan’s play Splendour in Paris (Théâtre Malakoff / Théâtre de Sénart – January 2020 and on tour in France). She is the artistic director of the French theatre company Nonumoï.

Robert 
Šantek is a freelance voice-over artist and radio host at Radio808, an online radio from Zagreb. He has worked as a translator, interpreter and screen writer for television gameshows. He grew up bilingual (Croatian and German) and is fluent in French and English. In his free time he sings in the Early Music Consort “Otium”. 

Emily-Céline Thompson (half-French) trained at Guildhall school of Music and Drama on their three year acting course, and also graduated with distinction and a first class degree in French and Drama from Bristol university. She is half French, but has been brought up and lived in London for most of her life when her family moved here.